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Pictish
#1
Like a lot of early Celtic languages, Pictish is so underattested that it's difficult to determine which branch it exactly came from. Most scholars now tend to consider it P-Celtic/Brythonic, and there is cultural evidence to back it up.

Intermarriages between Welsh and Pictish nobility were not at all uncommon, indicating they were more likely to share a related language. Recent genetic studies on Picts show that their closest living modern relatives are the Welsh and Cumbrians, something that these intermarriages alone could not account for. The modern Scottish Gaelic language contains a significant P-Celtic substratum- it started displacing Pictish in Dal Riata around the eighth century.

One of my language-related hobbies is attempting to recreate Pictish, similar to how some hobbyists are seeking to revive Cumbric. So far, I have a growing Gerlavir Prythonek (Pictish dictionary), which will include appendices with the recreated names of Pictish kings to the time of Kinet mab Elpin (Kenneth McAlpin) and toponyms. I will periodically update this thread as I work on it.
Tigertim, Megalophias, Webb And 7 others like this post
Avatar: The obverse of a coin of Kanishka I depicting the Buddha, with the Greco-Bactrian legend ΒΟΔΔΟ.

Follow my attempt at reviving Pictish.
Romanes-lekhipen- the Romani alphabet.
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#2
Selected toponyms in Neo-Pictish:

Alban- Scotland
Sesni- England
Kimri- Wales*
Iwerdhi- Ireland

Glasko- Glasgow
Din Etin- Edinburgh
Aber Den- Aberdeen
Kimbri- Cumbria*

*both have the same etymology and may have been represented by the same word in Pictish; however, I have chosen to disambiguate them.
Webb, JMcB, Rufus191 like this post
Avatar: The obverse of a coin of Kanishka I depicting the Buddha, with the Greco-Bactrian legend ΒΟΔΔΟ.

Follow my attempt at reviving Pictish.
Romanes-lekhipen- the Romani alphabet.
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#3
Reconstructed Pictish names of Ti Elpin (House of Alpin):

Kinet mab Elpin (Kenneth McAlpin, Cináed mac Ailpin, c. 810-13/2/858), possible King of Dal Riata (841-850) and King of Picts (843-858);
Duwmnall mab Elpin (Donald I McAlpin, Domnall mac Ailpín, c. 812-13/4/862), King of Picts (858-862), brother of Kinet mab Elpin;
Konstentin map Kinet (Constantine I, Causantín mac Cináeda, c. 836-877), King of Picts (862-877), son of Kinet and nephew of Duwmnall;
Edhan map Kinet (Hugh I, Áed mac Cináeda, ?-878), King of Picts (877-878), son of Kinet and brother of Konstentin;
Grer Mawr (map Duwmnall?; Gregory the Great; Giric mac Dúngail, c. 832-c.890), exact relationship to the rest of the House of Alpin unclear, possibly a son of Duwmnall; possibly co-ruler with Awkad; considered first King of Alba by some historians
Duwmnall map Konstentin (Donald II; Domnall mac Causantín, c. 30/6/862-c. 900), last monarch to carry the title of King of Picts (c. 890-900), considered first King of Alba by some historians; son of Konstentin map Kinet
Konstentin mab Edhan (Constantine II, Causantín mac Áeda, c. 879-952), King of Alba (c. 900-943); son of Edhan map Kinet; abdicated to become a monk
Waskolum map Duwmnall (Malcolm I; Máel Coluim mac Domnaill, 5/10/897-954), King of Alba (943-954); son of Duwmnall map Konstentin
Indulv map Konstentin (Indulf, Ildulb mac Causantín, c. 927-962), King of Alba (954-962); son of Konstentin mab Edhan
Dub map Waskolum (Dubh; Dub mac Maíl Coluim, Duff McMalcolm, c. 928-967); King of Alba (962-967), son of Waskolum map Duwmnall
Kolún mab Indulv (Cuilean, Colin, Cuilén mac Illuilb, c. 950-971); King of Alba (967-971), son of Indulv map Konstentin; assassinated by the Cumbric prince Rhydderch ap Dyfnwal
Imlav mab Indulv (Amlaíb mac Illuilb, c. 950-977; King of Alba (971-977), son of Indulv map Konstentin; order of succession uncertain, possibly coregent with Kinet map Waskolum
Kinet map Waskolum (Kenneth II, Cináed mac Maíl Coluim, c. 940-995), king of Alba (971-995), son of Waskolum map Duwmnall; order of succession uncertain, possibly coregent with Imlav mab Indulv
Konstentin map Kolún (Constantine III, Causantín mac Cuiléin, c. 970-997), king of Alba (995-997), son of Kolún mab Indulv; killed in battle by his relative Waskolum (possibly Waskolum map Kinet), exact location unknown
Kinet map Dub (Kenneth III, Coinneach mac Dhuibh, c. 966-25/3/1005), king of Alba (997-25/3/1005), son of Dub map Waskolum; killed at the Battle of Monzievaird by his cousin Waskolum map Kinet
Waskolum map Kinet (Malcolm II, Máel Coluim mac Cináeda, c. 954-25/11/1034), king of Alba (25/3/1005), son of Kinet map Waskolum; succeeded his cousin Kinet map Dub; last king of Alba/Scotland of the direct Ti Elpin lineage, his successor Dinkad map Krínún (Duncan I) was his grandson by his daughter Bethok verch Waskolum
Webb likes this post
Avatar: The obverse of a coin of Kanishka I depicting the Buddha, with the Greco-Bactrian legend ΒΟΔΔΟ.

Follow my attempt at reviving Pictish.
Romanes-lekhipen- the Romani alphabet.
Reply
#4
Day names in Neo-Pictish:

Monday- Didhlor
Tuesday- Didhmedók (note the medial /d/- there is evidence to suggest that in Pictish medial /d/ became /nt/, EXCEPT in Latin loans, which "Medók" is)
Wednesday- Dydhmercher
Thursday- Didhyó
Friday- Didhgwenner
Saturday- Didhsadwun
Sunday- Didhsul

Note that none of these are set in stone- I endeavour for Neo-Pictish to be as authentic as possible, and am always reading up on what we know of Pictish conventions.
Guto Rhys (2015) covers most known phonological conventions here.
Avatar: The obverse of a coin of Kanishka I depicting the Buddha, with the Greco-Bactrian legend ΒΟΔΔΟ.

Follow my attempt at reviving Pictish.
Romanes-lekhipen- the Romani alphabet.
Reply

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