Hello guest, if you read this it means you are not registered. Click here to register in a few simple steps, you will enjoy all features of our Forum.

Check for new replies
The genomic echoes of the last Green Sahara on the Fulani and Sahelian people.
#1
11-23-2023, 02:13 PM (This post was last modified: 11-23-2023, 02:14 PM by RCO.)
The genomic echoes of the last Green Sahara on the Fulani and Sahelian people
Author links open overlay panel Eugenia D’Atanasio et al
Current Biology - REPORT
Published:November 22, 2023DOI: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.cub.2023.10.075

Highlights
• 43 new modern 30× genomes mostly from Africa, focusing on the Sahelian Fulani herders
• Non-sub-Saharan ancestry component in Fulani similar to the Late Neolithic Moroccans
• The last Green Sahara as a major event for the Fulani/Sahelian genetic composition
• Two Fulani subgroups, with one experiencing higher admixture with neighboring peoples
Summary
The population history of the Sahara/Sahelian belt is understudied, despite previous work highlighting complex dynamics. 1 ,2 ,3 ,4 ,5 ,6 ,7 The Sahelian Fulani, i.e., the largest nomadic pastoral population in the world, 8 represent an interesting case because they show a non-negligible proportion of an Eurasian genetic component, usually explained by recent admixture with northern Africans. 1 ,2 ,5 ,6 ,7 ,9 ,10 ,11 ,12 Nevertheless, their origins are largely unknown, although several hypotheses have been proposed, including a possible link to ancient peoples settled in the Sahara during its last humid phase (Green Sahara, 12,000–5,000 years before present [BP]). 13 ,14 ,15 To shed light about the Fulani ancient genetic roots, we produced 23 high-coverage (30×) whole genomes from Fulani individuals from 8 Sahelian countries, plus 17 samples from other African groups and 3 from Europeans as controls, for a total of 43 new whole genomes. These data have been compared with 814 published modern whole genomes 2 ,16 ,17 ,18 and with relevant published ancient sequences (> 1,800 samples). 19 These analyses showed some evidence that the non-sub-Saharan genetic ancestry component of the Fulani might have also been shaped by older events, 1 ,5 ,6 possibly tracing the Fulani origins to unsampled ancient Green Saharan population(s). The joint analysis of modern and ancient samples allowed us to shed light on the genetic ancestry composition of such ancient Saharans, suggesting a similarity with Late Neolithic Moroccans and possibly pointing to a link with the spread of cattle herding. We also identified two different Fulani clusters whose admixture pattern may be informative about the historical Fulani movements and their later involvement in the western African empires.

Keywords whole genomes Green Sahara population genomics evolutionary genetics
Africa Sahel Fulani Fulbe

https://www.cell.com/current-biology/ful...23)01513-0
Psynome, Piquerobi, Genetics189291 And 5 others like this post
Reply
#2
Thanks was waiting for this
Reply
#3
Is the data released yet
Reply
#4
(12-23-2023, 10:01 PM)Genetics189291 Wrote: Is the data released yet

Not sure since it's behind a paywall. It was originally posted in the AncientDNA section and I posted it here.
Genetics189291 likes this post
Reply
#5
Data is at the European Genome-phenome Archive so not public as far as I know.
Preprint was available earlier and it also had a thread or two at Anthrogenica.
https://www.biorxiv.org/content/10.1101/...6.535569v1
I said at the time that I don't understand why they would just divide the samples into two clusters and only analyse them as clusters and not based on geographical origin, not give an explanation for why there is two clusters, and not even tell which ones from which country belong to which cluster. I wonder if there's more on this in the final paper.
I also said the authors won't release Y-haplogroup data, but that's because they actually had a pretty good paper on it earlier
https://genomebiology.biomedcentral.com/...018-1393-5
JMcB, Nguni, Capsian20 like this post
Reply
#6
(01-13-2024, 09:27 PM)kolompar Wrote: Data is at the European Genome-phenome Archive so not public as far as I know.
Preprint was available earlier and it also had a thread or two at Anthrogenica.
https://www.biorxiv.org/content/10.1101/...6.535569v1
I said at the time that I don't understand why they would just divide the samples into two clusters and only analyse them as clusters and not based on geographical origin, not give an explanation for why there is two clusters, and not even tell which ones from which country belong to which cluster. I wonder if there's more on this in the final paper.
I also said the authors won't release Y-haplogroup data, but that's because they actually had a pretty good paper on it earlier
https://genomebiology.biomedcentral.com/...018-1393-5

Thanks for the link, I think I remember the pre-print but the discussion around the two clusters was about the cameroon group and the guinea group. The former looked to have more mixed heritage than the later. Will need to refresh my memory
Reply

Check for new replies

Forum Jump:


Users browsing this thread: 1 Guest(s)