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Why Neanderthals and Denisovans Vanished - Blood Type analysis
#1
Quote:Why Neanderthals and Denisovans Vanished - Historic New Scientific Discovery.  One of the biggest questions concerning paleo-anthropologists was whether the Neanderthal population in Europe and Denisovans in Asia were full members of the present human species, a member of a subspecies, or a completely distinct species  Homo sapiens, the dominant species, took over Eurasia some 50,000 years ago, just as the Neanderthals and Denisovans were going extinct.  Indeed, We need to comprehend why Neanderthals and Denisovans vanished in order to comprehend how modern man came to control planet Earth.  An examination of Neanderthal and Denisovan blood types revealed that the ancient blood that once pumped through long extinct archaic people shared more genetic traits with modern humans than previously thought.  The New research fills in the gaps and helps us better comprehend how early humans lived and perished, ultimately laying the foundation for our current dominance of the planet.  Despite not being intended to investigate Neanderthal extinction, the study ultimately provided a novel approach to doing so.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=A0YguQBSCfE

I found this information quite interesting.  Blood type analysis harkens back to research by Cavalli-Sforza.
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#2
(02-14-2024, 05:24 PM)AimSmall Wrote:
Quote:Why Neanderthals and Denisovans Vanished - Historic New Scientific Discovery.  One of the biggest questions concerning paleo-anthropologists was whether the Neanderthal population in Europe and Denisovans in Asia were full members of the present human species, a member of a subspecies, or a completely distinct species  Homo sapiens, the dominant species, took over Eurasia some 50,000 years ago, just as the Neanderthals and Denisovans were going extinct.  Indeed, We need to comprehend why Neanderthals and Denisovans vanished in order to comprehend how modern man came to control planet Earth.  An examination of Neanderthal and Denisovan blood types revealed that the ancient blood that once pumped through long extinct archaic people shared more genetic traits with modern humans than previously thought.  The New research fills in the gaps and helps us better comprehend how early humans lived and perished, ultimately laying the foundation for our current dominance of the planet.  Despite not being intended to investigate Neanderthal extinction, the study ultimately provided a novel approach to doing so.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=A0YguQBSCfE

I found this information quite interesting.  Blood type analysis harkens back to research by Cavalli-Sforza.

Thanks you i have question is it possible to determine Type blood based on SNPs in blood analysis laboratories and blood donations?
Target: CapsianWGS_scaled
Distance: 1.2510% / 0.01251049
37.2 Iberomaurusian
36.8 Early_European_Farmer
12.8 Early_Levantine_Farmer
8.0 Steppe_Pastoralist
4.8 SSA
0.4 Iran_Neolithic
FTDNA : 91% North Africa +<2% Bedouin + <2  Southern-Levantinfo + <1 Sephardic Jewish + 3% Malta +  3%  Iberian Peninsula
23andME :  100% North Africa

WGS ( Y-DNA and mtDNA)
Y-DNA: E-A30032< A30480 ~1610 CE
mtDNA: V25b 800CE ? ( age mtDNA not accurate )
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#3
(02-14-2024, 05:36 PM)Capsian20 Wrote:
(02-14-2024, 05:24 PM)AimSmall Wrote:
Quote:Why Neanderthals and Denisovans Vanished - Historic New Scientific Discovery.  One of the biggest questions concerning paleo-anthropologists was whether the Neanderthal population in Europe and Denisovans in Asia were full members of the present human species, a member of a subspecies, or a completely distinct species  Homo sapiens, the dominant species, took over Eurasia some 50,000 years ago, just as the Neanderthals and Denisovans were going extinct.  Indeed, We need to comprehend why Neanderthals and Denisovans vanished in order to comprehend how modern man came to control planet Earth.  An examination of Neanderthal and Denisovan blood types revealed that the ancient blood that once pumped through long extinct archaic people shared more genetic traits with modern humans than previously thought.  The New research fills in the gaps and helps us better comprehend how early humans lived and perished, ultimately laying the foundation for our current dominance of the planet.  Despite not being intended to investigate Neanderthal extinction, the study ultimately provided a novel approach to doing so.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=A0YguQBSCfE

I found this information quite interesting.  Blood type analysis harkens back to research by Cavalli-Sforza.

Thanks you i have question is it possible to determine Type blood based on SNPs in blood analysis laboratories and blood donations?

Yes, ABO and Rh blood types can be determined from SNPs.  The old Anthrogenica site had a thread about it with a table containing salient data.  I recall that it worked correctly in predicting my blood types from my sequence.
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#4
(02-14-2024, 05:24 PM)AimSmall Wrote:
Quote:Why Neanderthals and Denisovans Vanished - Historic New Scientific Discovery.  One of the biggest questions concerning paleo-anthropologists was whether the Neanderthal population in Europe and Denisovans in Asia were full members of the present human species, a member of a subspecies, or a completely distinct species  Homo sapiens, the dominant species, took over Eurasia some 50,000 years ago, just as the Neanderthals and Denisovans were going extinct.  Indeed, We need to comprehend why Neanderthals and Denisovans vanished in order to comprehend how modern man came to control planet Earth.  An examination of Neanderthal and Denisovan blood types revealed that the ancient blood that once pumped through long extinct archaic people shared more genetic traits with modern humans than previously thought.  The New research fills in the gaps and helps us better comprehend how early humans lived and perished, ultimately laying the foundation for our current dominance of the planet.  Despite not being intended to investigate Neanderthal extinction, the study ultimately provided a novel approach to doing so.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=A0YguQBSCfE

I found this information quite interesting.  Blood type analysis harkens back to research by Cavalli-Sforza.

Interesting video.

Some parts of this video appear to show a misapprehension of the ABO system.  That system is based on an H substrate that is glycosylated by a glycosyltransferase that exists as an A or B allele.  These add different sugars to the same site on an existing sugar moiety on the surface of H.  Blood group O occurs when this glycosyltransferase is defective.  So the moment A and B glycosyltransferases exist,  AB is a certainty, the inevitable outcome of two co-dominant alleles rather than "appeared at some point throughout the years".

The video says A was ancestral and B appeared later (presumably in humans).  There was once the view that ABO arose repeatedly through convergent evolution but I don't think that is the view today.  Segurel et al, 2012 showed strong evidence that ABO was a trans-species polymorphism across primates in which one of A or B was occasionally lost (see fig 1 in Segurel).  The sequence used to encode each allele is preserved in the phylogenetic tree which is not expected with convergent evolution.  So A and B were already present ~20 million years ago.  Why the video seems so surprised there would be ABO in the ancestor to humans, Neandertal and Denisovan is puzzling.  Orangutans are fully ABO.

They may have been referring to Condemi et al, 2021 which is interesting work.  I was particularly interested in the Rh genotype reported in the video.  The issue with partial Rh genes is that when homozygous, the mother may mount an immune response against a fetus with an intact Rh gene.  This happens with humans in Rhesus disease, when an  RhD- (RhD-/RhD-) mother is exposed to blood from her RhD+ child and develops antibodies against RhD.  Any subsequent RhD+ fetus is then harmed by that response.  However, in humans, the RhD- allele frequency ranges 0.14-0.3 so even with all Rhesus disease risks, it's not as if selection is so strong as to eliminate it.  Why the partial Rh locus should be have had more serious consequences for the Neandertal is not immediately apparent to me.

The PLOS Genetics paper quoted in the video is Hubisz et al, 2020.
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