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Stolarek et al: Genetic history of East-Central Europe...
DIMINISHED PREVALENCE OF THE CURRENTLY PREDOMINANT CROATIAN Y HAPLOGROUP IN THE EARLY MIDDLE AGES

Šarac Jelena1, Havaš Auguštin Dubravka1, Zagorc Brina2,3, Novak Mario1,4, Carić Mario1, Novokmet Natalija1, Tresić Pavičić Dinko5, Fernandes Daniel2,3,6, Marjanović Damir1,7, Pinhasi Ron2,3

1Centre for Applied Bioanthropology, Institute for Anthropological Research, Zagreb, Croatia;
2Department of Evolutionary Anthropology, University of Vienna, Vienna, Austria;
3Human Evolution and Archaeological Sciences (HEAS), University of Vienna, Vienna, Austria;
4Department of Archaeology and Heritage, Faculty of Humanities, University of Primorska, Koper, Slovenia;
5Kaducej d.o.o., Split, Croatia;
6Research Centre for Anthropology and Health (CIAS), Department of Life Sciences, University of Coimbra, Coimbra, Croatia;
7International Burch University, Sarajevo, Bosnia and Herzegovina

Y haplogroup I2a2-M423 is a Paleolithic European marker most abundant in modern-day Bosnia and Herzegovina (over 55%), Croatia, and Serbia (around 40%). It was initially suggested that the halogroup survived the last Ice Age in refugial areas in Southeastern Europe and the Balkan Peninsula. However, more recent research introduced the possibility that it might have arrived in this region during later medieval migrations associated with the influx of Slavs and other populations and that it became dominant more recently. The objective of this study was to test if the I2a2 haplogroup is present at the early medieval Jagodnjak site (6-9th century CE), located in present-day Croatia and to compare obtained results with a more extensive, publicly available aDNA database (samples spanning from 1st to 15th century CE). Laboratory work was performed at the Department of Evolutionary Anthropology, University of Vienna. Shotgun sequencing of 9 male individuals was performed on Illumina NextSeq500 platform, and Yleaf program was used to infer Y hgs based on ISOGG nomenclature. Paternal genetic diversity in the sample was high, but the sample lacked I2a2 individuals. Half of males were assigned to the typical, local E1b1 hg and second most prevalent hg was R1a1a (33%), previously associated with Slavic migrations in Southeastern Europe. The more extensive database encompassed only 3.9% I2a2 carriers, from which only one was dated to a period preceding 6th century CE, indicating almost complete absence of I2a2 individuals in older historic periods. This preliminary finding provides an additional overview on the history of the Croatian territory, which should be more comprehensively analyzed by examining additional archaeological skeletal remains (possibly from older historical periods) as imperative to make evidence- based conclusions on the I2a2 origin and diversity in this region.

ANCIENT DNA PATERNITY TESTING AND KINSHIP ANALYSIS REVEALED FATHER – SON RELATIONSHIP IN TWO CASES OF CONGENITAL BUTTERFLY VERTEBRAE ANOMALY IN THE LATE AVAR POPULATION

Havaš Auguštin Dubravka1, Zagorc Brina2,3, Šarac Jelena1, Novak Mario1,4, Carić Mario1, Novokmet Natalija1, Rimpf Andrea5, Fernandes Daniel2,3,6, Olalde Iñigo7,8,9, Marjanović Damir1,10, Reich David9,11, Pinhasi Ron2,3

1Centre for Applied Bioanthropology, Institute for Anthropological Research, Zagreb, Croatia;
2Department of Evolutionary Anthropology, University of Vienna, Vienna, Austria;
3Human Evolution and Archaeological Sciences (HEAS), University of Vienna, Vienna, Austria;
4Department of Archaeology and Heritage, Faculty of Humanities, University of Primorska, Koper, Slovenia;
5Ilok Town Museum, Ilok, Croatia;
6Research Centre for Anthropology and Health (CIAS), Department of Life Sciences, University of Coimbra, Coimbra, Portugal;
7Department of Zoology and Animal Cell Biology, University of the Basque Country UPV/EHU, Vitoria-Gasteiz, Spain;
8Ikerbasque—Basque Foundation of Science, Bilbao, Spain;
9Department of Human Evolutionary Biology, Harvard University, Cambridge, MA, United States of America;
10International Burch University, Sarajevo, Bosnia and Herzegovina;
11Department of Genetics, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, United States of America

Recent methodological advances in sequencing technologies and ancient DNA extraction protocols from skeletal remains opened a window for direct insight into the past of human populations. Here we present an archeogenetic analysis of 43 individuals from the late Avar population (8th century) in the Šarengrad Klopare site from Eastern Croatia. The aim was to compare bioarcheological analysis of human remains with genetic findings to gain deeper insight into their social organization, health and genetic history. Extraction of aDNA and library preparation were performed in dedicated clean aDNA facilities. Sequencing was performed on Illumina NextSeq500 platform. Haplogrep2 was used to assign mtDNA haplogroups, and Yleaf program to infer Y haplogroups. Kinship analysis up to the 4th degree of ancestry was estimated using the READ and TKGWV2 methods. Bioanthropological examination of this population showed an absence of intentional perimortem injuries. At the same time, kinship analysis revealed the presence of at least four families with up to four degrees of relatedness, both pointing to the continuation of living on this territory for a more extended period. Some burials suggested social stratification, particularly in several traditional horseman graves. One was an adult male (grave 25) with an interesting finding of a congenital anomaly called butterfly vertebra. The same anomaly was found in a young adolescent (grave 21). In both cases, the malformation was located on the 4th lumbar vertebrae. Kinship and Y chromosome analysis confirmed that these two individuals were father and son, belonging to the southern European Y haplogroup E1b1b1a1b1a. Their mitogenome analysis also revealed European haplogroups, T1a and H46, all pointing to mixing with local communities over a longer period. This finding emphasizes the importance of using ancient DNA analysis to shed light on ancient populations’ genetic ancestry and health with little or no written historical record.

https://inantro.hr/journal-of-bioanthrop...-genetics/
Alain, ph2ter, T101 And 2 others like this post
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(06-18-2024, 08:17 PM)Radko Wrote: DIMINISHED PREVALENCE OF THE CURRENTLY PREDOMINANT CROATIAN Y HAPLOGROUP IN THE EARLY MIDDLE AGES

Šarac Jelena1, Havaš Auguštin Dubravka1, Zagorc Brina2,3, Novak Mario1,4, Carić Mario1, Novokmet Natalija1, Tresić Pavičić Dinko5, Fernandes Daniel2,3,6, Marjanović Damir1,7, Pinhasi Ron2,3

1Centre for Applied Bioanthropology, Institute for Anthropological Research, Zagreb, Croatia;
2Department of Evolutionary Anthropology, University of Vienna, Vienna, Austria;
3Human Evolution and Archaeological Sciences (HEAS), University of Vienna, Vienna, Austria;
4Department of Archaeology and Heritage, Faculty of Humanities, University of Primorska, Koper, Slovenia;
5Kaducej d.o.o., Split, Croatia;
6Research Centre for Anthropology and Health (CIAS), Department of Life Sciences, University of Coimbra, Coimbra, Croatia;
7International Burch University, Sarajevo, Bosnia and Herzegovina

Y haplogroup I2a2-M423 is a Paleolithic European marker most abundant in modern-day Bosnia and Herzegovina (over 55%), Croatia, and Serbia (around 40%). It was initially suggested that the halogroup survived the last Ice Age in refugial areas in Southeastern Europe and the Balkan Peninsula. However, more recent research introduced the possibility that it might have arrived in this region during later medieval migrations associated with the influx of Slavs and other populations and that it became dominant more recently. The objective of this study was to test if the I2a2 haplogroup is present at the early medieval Jagodnjak site (6-9th century CE), located in present-day Croatia and to compare obtained results with a more extensive, publicly available aDNA database (samples spanning from 1st to 15th century CE). Laboratory work was performed at the Department of Evolutionary Anthropology, University of Vienna. Shotgun sequencing of 9 male individuals was performed on Illumina NextSeq500 platform, and Yleaf program was used to infer Y hgs based on ISOGG nomenclature. Paternal genetic diversity in the sample was high, but the sample lacked I2a2 individuals. Half of males were assigned to the typical, local E1b1 hg and second most prevalent hg was R1a1a (33%), previously associated with Slavic migrations in Southeastern Europe. The more extensive database encompassed only 3.9% I2a2 carriers, from which only one was dated to a period preceding 6th century CE, indicating almost complete absence of I2a2 individuals in older historic periods. This preliminary finding provides an additional overview on the history of the Croatian territory, which should be more comprehensively analyzed by examining additional archaeological skeletal remains (possibly from older historical periods) as imperative to make evidence- based conclusions on the I2a2 origin and diversity in this region.

ANCIENT DNA PATERNITY TESTING AND KINSHIP ANALYSIS REVEALED FATHER – SON RELATIONSHIP IN TWO CASES OF CONGENITAL BUTTERFLY VERTEBRAE ANOMALY IN THE LATE AVAR POPULATION

Havaš Auguštin Dubravka1, Zagorc Brina2,3, Šarac Jelena1, Novak Mario1,4, Carić Mario1, Novokmet Natalija1, Rimpf Andrea5, Fernandes Daniel2,3,6, Olalde Iñigo7,8,9, Marjanović Damir1,10, Reich David9,11, Pinhasi Ron2,3

1Centre for Applied Bioanthropology, Institute for Anthropological Research, Zagreb, Croatia;
2Department of Evolutionary Anthropology, University of Vienna, Vienna, Austria;
3Human Evolution and Archaeological Sciences (HEAS), University of Vienna, Vienna, Austria;
4Department of Archaeology and Heritage, Faculty of Humanities, University of Primorska, Koper, Slovenia;
5Ilok Town Museum, Ilok, Croatia;
6Research Centre for Anthropology and Health (CIAS), Department of Life Sciences, University of Coimbra, Coimbra, Portugal;
7Department of Zoology and Animal Cell Biology, University of the Basque Country UPV/EHU, Vitoria-Gasteiz, Spain;
8Ikerbasque—Basque Foundation of Science, Bilbao, Spain;
9Department of Human Evolutionary Biology, Harvard University, Cambridge, MA, United States of America;
10International Burch University, Sarajevo, Bosnia and Herzegovina;
11Department of Genetics, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, United States of America

Recent methodological advances in sequencing technologies and ancient DNA extraction protocols from skeletal remains opened a window for direct insight into the past of human populations. Here we present an archeogenetic analysis of 43 individuals from the late Avar population (8th century) in the Šarengrad Klopare site from Eastern Croatia. The aim was to compare bioarcheological analysis of human remains with genetic findings to gain deeper insight into their social organization, health and genetic history. Extraction of aDNA and library preparation were performed in dedicated clean aDNA facilities. Sequencing was performed on Illumina NextSeq500 platform. Haplogrep2 was used to assign mtDNA haplogroups, and Yleaf program to infer Y haplogroups. Kinship analysis up to the 4th degree of ancestry was estimated using the READ and TKGWV2 methods. Bioanthropological examination of this population showed an absence of intentional perimortem injuries. At the same time, kinship analysis revealed the presence of at least four families with up to four degrees of relatedness, both pointing to the continuation of living on this territory for a more extended period. Some burials suggested social stratification, particularly in several traditional horseman graves. One was an adult male (grave 25) with an interesting finding of a congenital anomaly called butterfly vertebra. The same anomaly was found in a young adolescent (grave 21). In both cases, the malformation was located on the 4th lumbar vertebrae. Kinship and Y chromosome analysis confirmed that these two individuals were father and son, belonging to the southern European Y haplogroup E1b1b1a1b1a. Their mitogenome analysis also revealed European haplogroups, T1a and H46, all pointing to mixing with local communities over a longer period. This finding emphasizes the importance of using ancient DNA analysis to shed light on ancient populations’ genetic ancestry and health with little or no written historical record.

https://inantro.hr/journal-of-bioanthrop...-genetics/

M423 is I2a1a2 not I2a2. I am embarrassed. Why they use older nomenclature.
okshtunas, Vinitharya, jamtastic And 4 others like this post
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(06-18-2024, 08:31 PM)ph2ter Wrote:
(06-18-2024, 08:17 PM)Radko Wrote: DIMINISHED PREVALENCE OF THE CURRENTLY PREDOMINANT CROATIAN Y HAPLOGROUP IN THE EARLY MIDDLE AGES

Šarac Jelena1, Havaš Auguštin Dubravka1, Zagorc Brina2,3, Novak Mario1,4, Carić Mario1, Novokmet Natalija1, Tresić Pavičić Dinko5, Fernandes Daniel2,3,6, Marjanović Damir1,7, Pinhasi Ron2,3

1Centre for Applied Bioanthropology, Institute for Anthropological Research, Zagreb, Croatia;
2Department of Evolutionary Anthropology, University of Vienna, Vienna, Austria;
3Human Evolution and Archaeological Sciences (HEAS), University of Vienna, Vienna, Austria;
4Department of Archaeology and Heritage, Faculty of Humanities, University of Primorska, Koper, Slovenia;
5Kaducej d.o.o., Split, Croatia;
6Research Centre for Anthropology and Health (CIAS), Department of Life Sciences, University of Coimbra, Coimbra, Croatia;
7International Burch University, Sarajevo, Bosnia and Herzegovina

Y haplogroup I2a2-M423 is a Paleolithic European marker most abundant in modern-day Bosnia and Herzegovina (over 55%), Croatia, and Serbia (around 40%). It was initially suggested that the halogroup survived the last Ice Age in refugial areas in Southeastern Europe and the Balkan Peninsula. However, more recent research introduced the possibility that it might have arrived in this region during later medieval migrations associated with the influx of Slavs and other populations and that it became dominant more recently. The objective of this study was to test if the I2a2 haplogroup is present at the early medieval Jagodnjak site (6-9th century CE), located in present-day Croatia and to compare obtained results with a more extensive, publicly available aDNA database (samples spanning from 1st to 15th century CE). Laboratory work was performed at the Department of Evolutionary Anthropology, University of Vienna. Shotgun sequencing of 9 male individuals was performed on Illumina NextSeq500 platform, and Yleaf program was used to infer Y hgs based on ISOGG nomenclature. Paternal genetic diversity in the sample was high, but the sample lacked I2a2 individuals. Half of males were assigned to the typical, local E1b1 hg and second most prevalent hg was R1a1a (33%), previously associated with Slavic migrations in Southeastern Europe. The more extensive database encompassed only 3.9% I2a2 carriers, from which only one was dated to a period preceding 6th century CE, indicating almost complete absence of I2a2 individuals in older historic periods. This preliminary finding provides an additional overview on the history of the Croatian territory, which should be more comprehensively analyzed by examining additional archaeological skeletal remains (possibly from older historical periods) as imperative to make evidence- based conclusions on the I2a2 origin and diversity in this region.

ANCIENT DNA PATERNITY TESTING AND KINSHIP ANALYSIS REVEALED FATHER – SON RELATIONSHIP IN TWO CASES OF CONGENITAL BUTTERFLY VERTEBRAE ANOMALY IN THE LATE AVAR POPULATION

Havaš Auguštin Dubravka1, Zagorc Brina2,3, Šarac Jelena1, Novak Mario1,4, Carić Mario1, Novokmet Natalija1, Rimpf Andrea5, Fernandes Daniel2,3,6, Olalde Iñigo7,8,9, Marjanović Damir1,10, Reich David9,11, Pinhasi Ron2,3

1Centre for Applied Bioanthropology, Institute for Anthropological Research, Zagreb, Croatia;
2Department of Evolutionary Anthropology, University of Vienna, Vienna, Austria;
3Human Evolution and Archaeological Sciences (HEAS), University of Vienna, Vienna, Austria;
4Department of Archaeology and Heritage, Faculty of Humanities, University of Primorska, Koper, Slovenia;
5Ilok Town Museum, Ilok, Croatia;
6Research Centre for Anthropology and Health (CIAS), Department of Life Sciences, University of Coimbra, Coimbra, Portugal;
7Department of Zoology and Animal Cell Biology, University of the Basque Country UPV/EHU, Vitoria-Gasteiz, Spain;
8Ikerbasque—Basque Foundation of Science, Bilbao, Spain;
9Department of Human Evolutionary Biology, Harvard University, Cambridge, MA, United States of America;
10International Burch University, Sarajevo, Bosnia and Herzegovina;
11Department of Genetics, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, United States of America

Recent methodological advances in sequencing technologies and ancient DNA extraction protocols from skeletal remains opened a window for direct insight into the past of human populations. Here we present an archeogenetic analysis of 43 individuals from the late Avar population (8th century) in the Šarengrad Klopare site from Eastern Croatia. The aim was to compare bioarcheological analysis of human remains with genetic findings to gain deeper insight into their social organization, health and genetic history. Extraction of aDNA and library preparation were performed in dedicated clean aDNA facilities. Sequencing was performed on Illumina NextSeq500 platform. Haplogrep2 was used to assign mtDNA haplogroups, and Yleaf program to infer Y haplogroups. Kinship analysis up to the 4th degree of ancestry was estimated using the READ and TKGWV2 methods. Bioanthropological examination of this population showed an absence of intentional perimortem injuries. At the same time, kinship analysis revealed the presence of at least four families with up to four degrees of relatedness, both pointing to the continuation of living on this territory for a more extended period. Some burials suggested social stratification, particularly in several traditional horseman graves. One was an adult male (grave 25) with an interesting finding of a congenital anomaly called butterfly vertebra. The same anomaly was found in a young adolescent (grave 21). In both cases, the malformation was located on the 4th lumbar vertebrae. Kinship and Y chromosome analysis confirmed that these two individuals were father and son, belonging to the southern European Y haplogroup E1b1b1a1b1a. Their mitogenome analysis also revealed European haplogroups, T1a and H46, all pointing to mixing with local communities over a longer period. This finding emphasizes the importance of using ancient DNA analysis to shed light on ancient populations’ genetic ancestry and health with little or no written historical record.

https://inantro.hr/journal-of-bioanthrop...-genetics/

M423 is I2a1a2 not I2a2. I am embarrassed. Why they use older nomenclature.

Also, how can 9 males from 1 site really be compared to modern distribution? Also trying to prove I2a origin in the region....thats some old science.
pelop, Alain, Megalophias And 4 others like this post
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This is the second Slavic autochthonist "article" without factual basis and more leaning toward fantasy coming from Croatian authors. IIRC correctly just some 1 or 2 weeks ago there was another one with similar pseudoscientific claims regarding Slavic haplogroup I-Y3120 being Western Paleo-Balkan.
okshtunas, Radko, Galadhorn And 3 others like this post
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(06-18-2024, 11:08 AM)Vayu Wrote: [Image: posterdates.png]

Vayu are you really author of the Vahaduo as you added in your profile? To this very day this person (if it is really you) never showed on-line any connection to Poland and interest in our genetics (modern or ancient)... Just asking what happened that you made coming out?
Galadhorn likes this post
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These Croatian articles are a great disappointment.
They are parallel to Polish autochthonists, but from a Balkan and Croatian perspective.
Dragan Primorac is behind all this.
Bukva_, Galadhorn, Radko And 4 others like this post
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(06-18-2024, 08:31 PM)ph2ter Wrote:
(06-18-2024, 08:17 PM)Radko Wrote: DIMINISHED PREVALENCE OF THE CURRENTLY PREDOMINANT CROATIAN Y HAPLOGROUP IN THE EARLY MIDDLE AGES

Šarac Jelena1, Havaš Auguštin Dubravka1, Zagorc Brina2,3, Novak Mario1,4, Carić Mario1, Novokmet Natalija1, Tresić Pavičić Dinko5, Fernandes Daniel2,3,6, Marjanović Damir1,7, Pinhasi Ron2,3

1Centre for Applied Bioanthropology, Institute for Anthropological Research, Zagreb, Croatia;
2Department of Evolutionary Anthropology, University of Vienna, Vienna, Austria;
3Human Evolution and Archaeological Sciences (HEAS), University of Vienna, Vienna, Austria;
4Department of Archaeology and Heritage, Faculty of Humanities, University of Primorska, Koper, Slovenia;
5Kaducej d.o.o., Split, Croatia;
6Research Centre for Anthropology and Health (CIAS), Department of Life Sciences, University of Coimbra, Coimbra, Croatia;
7International Burch University, Sarajevo, Bosnia and Herzegovina

Y haplogroup I2a2-M423 is a Paleolithic European marker most abundant in modern-day Bosnia and Herzegovina (over 55%), Croatia, and Serbia (around 40%). It was initially suggested that the halogroup survived the last Ice Age in refugial areas in Southeastern Europe and the Balkan Peninsula. However, more recent research introduced the possibility that it might have arrived in this region during later medieval migrations associated with the influx of Slavs and other populations and that it became dominant more recently. The objective of this study was to test if the I2a2 haplogroup is present at the early medieval Jagodnjak site (6-9th century CE), located in present-day Croatia and to compare obtained results with a more extensive, publicly available aDNA database (samples spanning from 1st to 15th century CE). Laboratory work was performed at the Department of Evolutionary Anthropology, University of Vienna. Shotgun sequencing of 9 male individuals was performed on Illumina NextSeq500 platform, and Yleaf program was used to infer Y hgs based on ISOGG nomenclature. Paternal genetic diversity in the sample was high, but the sample lacked I2a2 individuals. Half of males were assigned to the typical, local E1b1 hg and second most prevalent hg was R1a1a (33%), previously associated with Slavic migrations in Southeastern Europe. The more extensive database encompassed only 3.9% I2a2 carriers, from which only one was dated to a period preceding 6th century CE, indicating almost complete absence of I2a2 individuals in older historic periods. This preliminary finding provides an additional overview on the history of the Croatian territory, which should be more comprehensively analyzed by examining additional archaeological skeletal remains (possibly from older historical periods) as imperative to make evidence- based conclusions on the I2a2 origin and diversity in this region.

ANCIENT DNA PATERNITY TESTING AND KINSHIP ANALYSIS REVEALED FATHER – SON RELATIONSHIP IN TWO CASES OF CONGENITAL BUTTERFLY VERTEBRAE ANOMALY IN THE LATE AVAR POPULATION

Havaš Auguštin Dubravka1, Zagorc Brina2,3, Šarac Jelena1, Novak Mario1,4, Carić Mario1, Novokmet Natalija1, Rimpf Andrea5, Fernandes Daniel2,3,6, Olalde Iñigo7,8,9, Marjanović Damir1,10, Reich David9,11, Pinhasi Ron2,3

1Centre for Applied Bioanthropology, Institute for Anthropological Research, Zagreb, Croatia;
2Department of Evolutionary Anthropology, University of Vienna, Vienna, Austria;
3Human Evolution and Archaeological Sciences (HEAS), University of Vienna, Vienna, Austria;
4Department of Archaeology and Heritage, Faculty of Humanities, University of Primorska, Koper, Slovenia;
5Ilok Town Museum, Ilok, Croatia;
6Research Centre for Anthropology and Health (CIAS), Department of Life Sciences, University of Coimbra, Coimbra, Portugal;
7Department of Zoology and Animal Cell Biology, University of the Basque Country UPV/EHU, Vitoria-Gasteiz, Spain;
8Ikerbasque—Basque Foundation of Science, Bilbao, Spain;
9Department of Human Evolutionary Biology, Harvard University, Cambridge, MA, United States of America;
10International Burch University, Sarajevo, Bosnia and Herzegovina;
11Department of Genetics, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, United States of America

Recent methodological advances in sequencing technologies and ancient DNA extraction protocols from skeletal remains opened a window for direct insight into the past of human populations. Here we present an archeogenetic analysis of 43 individuals from the late Avar population (8th century) in the Šarengrad Klopare site from Eastern Croatia. The aim was to compare bioarcheological analysis of human remains with genetic findings to gain deeper insight into their social organization, health and genetic history. Extraction of aDNA and library preparation were performed in dedicated clean aDNA facilities. Sequencing was performed on Illumina NextSeq500 platform. Haplogrep2 was used to assign mtDNA haplogroups, and Yleaf program to infer Y haplogroups. Kinship analysis up to the 4th degree of ancestry was estimated using the READ and TKGWV2 methods. Bioanthropological examination of this population showed an absence of intentional perimortem injuries. At the same time, kinship analysis revealed the presence of at least four families with up to four degrees of relatedness, both pointing to the continuation of living on this territory for a more extended period. Some burials suggested social stratification, particularly in several traditional horseman graves. One was an adult male (grave 25) with an interesting finding of a congenital anomaly called butterfly vertebra. The same anomaly was found in a young adolescent (grave 21). In both cases, the malformation was located on the 4th lumbar vertebrae. Kinship and Y chromosome analysis confirmed that these two individuals were father and son, belonging to the southern European Y haplogroup E1b1b1a1b1a. Their mitogenome analysis also revealed European haplogroups, T1a and H46, all pointing to mixing with local communities over a longer period. This finding emphasizes the importance of using ancient DNA analysis to shed light on ancient populations’ genetic ancestry and health with little or no written historical record.

https://inantro.hr/journal-of-bioanthrop...-genetics/

M423 is I2a1a2 not I2a2. I am embarrassed. Why they use older nomenclature.

What's worse is the claim it's Paleolithic and has survived in those areas to the modern day. Complete ignorance of Y3120 and later affiliations. 

Almost like it was published 8 years ago lol.
ph2ter, Bukva_, Vinitharya And 5 others like this post
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(06-19-2024, 01:54 AM)okshtunas Wrote:
(06-18-2024, 08:31 PM)ph2ter Wrote:
(06-18-2024, 08:17 PM)Radko Wrote: DIMINISHED PREVALENCE OF THE CURRENTLY PREDOMINANT CROATIAN Y HAPLOGROUP IN THE EARLY MIDDLE AGES

Šarac Jelena1, Havaš Auguštin Dubravka1, Zagorc Brina2,3, Novak Mario1,4, Carić Mario1, Novokmet Natalija1, Tresić Pavičić Dinko5, Fernandes Daniel2,3,6, Marjanović Damir1,7, Pinhasi Ron2,3

1Centre for Applied Bioanthropology, Institute for Anthropological Research, Zagreb, Croatia;
2Department of Evolutionary Anthropology, University of Vienna, Vienna, Austria;
3Human Evolution and Archaeological Sciences (HEAS), University of Vienna, Vienna, Austria;
4Department of Archaeology and Heritage, Faculty of Humanities, University of Primorska, Koper, Slovenia;
5Kaducej d.o.o., Split, Croatia;
6Research Centre for Anthropology and Health (CIAS), Department of Life Sciences, University of Coimbra, Coimbra, Croatia;
7International Burch University, Sarajevo, Bosnia and Herzegovina

Y haplogroup I2a2-M423 is a Paleolithic European marker most abundant in modern-day Bosnia and Herzegovina (over 55%), Croatia, and Serbia (around 40%). It was initially suggested that the halogroup survived the last Ice Age in refugial areas in Southeastern Europe and the Balkan Peninsula. However, more recent research introduced the possibility that it might have arrived in this region during later medieval migrations associated with the influx of Slavs and other populations and that it became dominant more recently. The objective of this study was to test if the I2a2 haplogroup is present at the early medieval Jagodnjak site (6-9th century CE), located in present-day Croatia and to compare obtained results with a more extensive, publicly available aDNA database (samples spanning from 1st to 15th century CE). Laboratory work was performed at the Department of Evolutionary Anthropology, University of Vienna. Shotgun sequencing of 9 male individuals was performed on Illumina NextSeq500 platform, and Yleaf program was used to infer Y hgs based on ISOGG nomenclature. Paternal genetic diversity in the sample was high, but the sample lacked I2a2 individuals. Half of males were assigned to the typical, local E1b1 hg and second most prevalent hg was R1a1a (33%), previously associated with Slavic migrations in Southeastern Europe. The more extensive database encompassed only 3.9% I2a2 carriers, from which only one was dated to a period preceding 6th century CE, indicating almost complete absence of I2a2 individuals in older historic periods. This preliminary finding provides an additional overview on the history of the Croatian territory, which should be more comprehensively analyzed by examining additional archaeological skeletal remains (possibly from older historical periods) as imperative to make evidence- based conclusions on the I2a2 origin and diversity in this region.

ANCIENT DNA PATERNITY TESTING AND KINSHIP ANALYSIS REVEALED FATHER – SON RELATIONSHIP IN TWO CASES OF CONGENITAL BUTTERFLY VERTEBRAE ANOMALY IN THE LATE AVAR POPULATION

Havaš Auguštin Dubravka1, Zagorc Brina2,3, Šarac Jelena1, Novak Mario1,4, Carić Mario1, Novokmet Natalija1, Rimpf Andrea5, Fernandes Daniel2,3,6, Olalde Iñigo7,8,9, Marjanović Damir1,10, Reich David9,11, Pinhasi Ron2,3

1Centre for Applied Bioanthropology, Institute for Anthropological Research, Zagreb, Croatia;
2Department of Evolutionary Anthropology, University of Vienna, Vienna, Austria;
3Human Evolution and Archaeological Sciences (HEAS), University of Vienna, Vienna, Austria;
4Department of Archaeology and Heritage, Faculty of Humanities, University of Primorska, Koper, Slovenia;
5Ilok Town Museum, Ilok, Croatia;
6Research Centre for Anthropology and Health (CIAS), Department of Life Sciences, University of Coimbra, Coimbra, Portugal;
7Department of Zoology and Animal Cell Biology, University of the Basque Country UPV/EHU, Vitoria-Gasteiz, Spain;
8Ikerbasque—Basque Foundation of Science, Bilbao, Spain;
9Department of Human Evolutionary Biology, Harvard University, Cambridge, MA, United States of America;
10International Burch University, Sarajevo, Bosnia and Herzegovina;
11Department of Genetics, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, United States of America

Recent methodological advances in sequencing technologies and ancient DNA extraction protocols from skeletal remains opened a window for direct insight into the past of human populations. Here we present an archeogenetic analysis of 43 individuals from the late Avar population (8th century) in the Šarengrad Klopare site from Eastern Croatia. The aim was to compare bioarcheological analysis of human remains with genetic findings to gain deeper insight into their social organization, health and genetic history. Extraction of aDNA and library preparation were performed in dedicated clean aDNA facilities. Sequencing was performed on Illumina NextSeq500 platform. Haplogrep2 was used to assign mtDNA haplogroups, and Yleaf program to infer Y haplogroups. Kinship analysis up to the 4th degree of ancestry was estimated using the READ and TKGWV2 methods. Bioanthropological examination of this population showed an absence of intentional perimortem injuries. At the same time, kinship analysis revealed the presence of at least four families with up to four degrees of relatedness, both pointing to the continuation of living on this territory for a more extended period. Some burials suggested social stratification, particularly in several traditional horseman graves. One was an adult male (grave 25) with an interesting finding of a congenital anomaly called butterfly vertebra. The same anomaly was found in a young adolescent (grave 21). In both cases, the malformation was located on the 4th lumbar vertebrae. Kinship and Y chromosome analysis confirmed that these two individuals were father and son, belonging to the southern European Y haplogroup E1b1b1a1b1a. Their mitogenome analysis also revealed European haplogroups, T1a and H46, all pointing to mixing with local communities over a longer period. This finding emphasizes the importance of using ancient DNA analysis to shed light on ancient populations’ genetic ancestry and health with little or no written historical record.

https://inantro.hr/journal-of-bioanthrop...-genetics/

M423 is I2a1a2 not I2a2. I am embarrassed. Why they use older nomenclature.

What's worse is the claim it's Paleolithic and has survived in those areas to the modern day. Complete ignorance of Y3120 and later affiliations. 

Almost like it was published 8 years ago lol.

I am almost sure that they slept through the last 10 years of research and that these articles need them only to fill a quota of peer reviewed scientific articles.
The sites of Jagodnjak and Šarengrad were not even located inside Medieval Croatian state.
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(06-19-2024, 01:54 AM)okshtunas Wrote: What's worse is the claim it's Paleolithic and has survived in those areas to the modern day. Complete ignorance of Y3120 and later affiliations. 

Almost like it was published 8 years ago lol.

Well, South Slavic especially Serbian and Croatian circles on social media are loving this one. Viewing it as some sort of proof for an Illyrian origin of Slavic marker I-Y3120. What is rather disturbing is how such fringe theories get spread by supposed academics of multiple universities of a country.
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They try to draw conclusions based on the sites of Jagodnjak and Šarengrad which were part of Hungary, not Croatia in Medieval Age. Šarengrad was part of Bulgaria from 830 till the Hungarian invasion at the beginning of the 10th century (and it was maybe part of duke Liudewit's Pannonia Inferior at the beginning of the 9th century, but before it was part of Avar kaghanat).

[Image: Jagodnjak.png]
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Y3120 is a Carpathian paternal line, so she did not come to Croatia from far away.
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(06-19-2024, 07:49 AM)ph2ter Wrote: They try to draw conclusions based on the sites of Jagodnjak and Šarengrad which were part of Hungary, not Croatia in Medieval Age. Šarengrad was part of Bulgaria from 830 till the Hungarian invasion at the beginning of the 10th century (and it was maybe part of duke Liudewit's Pannonia Inferior at the beginning of the 9th century, but before it was part of Avar kaghanat).

[Image: Jagodnjak.png]

Do you know something about the sample size? Given that 3,9% (rounded) for I2a is indicated, it either has to be 1/26, 2/52, 3/78 and so on.
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It is so sad when they use such poor material, like we don't have any.
For example:
Nin-Ždrijac
Quote:A total of 334 early medieval graves were investigated at the Ždrijac position, a sandy isthmus not far north of Nin, under the leadership of Janko Belošević. Belošević dates this cemetery to the eighth century and its use through to the first half of the ninth century (Belošević 1980; 2007).
Maklinovo Brdo
Quote:Fifty-five skeletal graves have been investigated in the course of a number of archaeological campaigns at Maklinovo brdo. Many pagan burial rituals were identified at this cemetery such as the beheading of the deceased and the placement of stones on the corpse. The cemetery is dated to the eighth century, and remained in use up to the first half of the ninth century (Belošević 1980, 2010).
[Image: Snimka-zaslona-2024-06-19-110356.png]
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01 July 2024 | 11.15-12.45 | University of Leeds

Fourth session of HistoGenes at the IMC 2024

MONDAY 1 JULY 2024: 11.15 - 12.45 | Esther Simpson Building: 1.01

Session 127: Genetic Histories in Times of Crisis, I: New Insights into Migration-Period Eastern Central Europe

Organiser: Clemens Ganter | Institut für Österreichische Geschichtsforschung | Universität Wien

Moderator: Walter Pohl | Institut für Mittelalterforschung | ÖAW | Wien

➢ From Periphery to Center: The Other Side of the Middle Danube in Late Antiquity
Salvatore Liccardo | Institut für Österreichische Geschichtsforschung | Universität Wien

➢Transformation of the East Austrian Region in the 5th and 6th Centuries: The
Archaeological Perspective
Bendeguz Tobias, Institut für Mittelalterforschung | ÖAW | Wien

➢ Communities and Society in 5th- and 6th-Century Pannonia in the Light of Recent
Palaeogenomic and Archaeological Results
István Koncz | Institute of Archaeological Sciences | Eötvös Loránd University Budapest

MONDAY 1 JULY 2024: 14.15-15.45 | Esther Simpson Building: 1.01

Session 227: Genetic Histories in Times of Crisis, II: The Emergence and Decline of Slavic Powers in 9th-Century Eastern Central Europa

Organiser & Moderator: Clemens Ganter | Universität Wien

➢ The Emergence of Slavic Communities in Eastern Central Europe
Walter Pohl | Institut für Mittelalterforschung | ÖAW | Wien

➢ The Emergence, Development, and Collapse of Moravian Communities in the 8th-
9th Century: An Archaeological Overview
Jiří Macháček  | Ústav archeologie a muzeologie | Masarykova univerzita | Brn

➢ Genetic Insights into the Emergence of New Communities in the 8th and 9th
Centuries in Central Europe

Zuzana Hofmanová |Abteilung für Archäogenetik | Max-Planck-Institut für Evolutionäre Anthropologie | Leipzig

MONDAY 1 JULY 2024: 16.30-18.00 | Esther Simpson Building: 1.01
Session 327: Genetic Histories in Times of Crisis, III: Communities in Late Avar Age and
Carolingian Pannonia

Organiser: Clemens Ganter | Universität Wien
Moderator: Zuzana Hofmanová | Max-Planck-Institut für Evolutionäre Anthropologie | Leipzig
Respondent: Steffen Patzold | Seminar für mittelalterliche Geschichte | Eberhard Karls Universität
Tübingen

➢The Emergence and Development of 8th- to 9th-Century Communities in the Zala
Region
Levente Samu | Institute of Archaeological Sciences | Eötvös Loránd University | Budapest
➢ Archaeogenetic Clues to the Contacts and Social Structure of Communities from the
Zala Region
Denisa Zlámalová | Ústav archeologie a muzeologie | Masarykova univerzita | Brno

Sponsor: HistoGenes: ERC Synergy Grant Project No 856453

For more information please visit https://www.imc.leeds.ac.uk/.
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Is there any IMC Leeds 2024 abstract book?

I found only session descriptions...

127 - Genetic Histories in Times of Crisis, I: New Insights into Migration-Period Eastern Central Europe

Description
This is the first of three sessions presenting results and ongoing research from the ERC Synergy grant project HistoGenes. Between the third and the sixth century, the Middle Danube region went through radical transformations, which are reflected in the written and material evidence. The geographical position of the region made it suitable as a base for military campaigns directed to both the Eastern and Western Roman Empire. Arguably, no other region of the Roman Empire experienced so many migrations and changes of dominion. These shifts manifest themselves in changes of settlement, of burial customs and in transformations of material culture, which raises questions about how people lived through this succession of crises, and to what extent populations changed. The papers in this session reflect on the state of the art in the concerned disciplines, and address the question how archaeogenetic analyses and their interdisciplinary interpretation can take us beyond current knowledge.

227 - Genetic Histories in Times of Crisis, II: The Emergence and Decline of Slavic Powers in 9th-Century Eastern Central Europe

Description
In many parts of Eastern Central Europe, the archaeological evidence becomes very patchy after the 6th century, apart from traces of cremation burials, simply pottery and sunken huts. This cultural crisis that affected all observable aspects of life is often associated with at least partial demographic change, the arrival of new groups and/or the adaptation of old ones to very simple lfe-styles, and the spread of Slavic language in these areas. ‘Slavic’ communities and elites begin to emerge more clearly in the 8th, and take shape in the 9th century, in the wake of the Carolingian expansion into former Avar territories. The main power centres that came into their own, if under more or less intrusive Carolingian influence, were the Moravian duchy with its centres at Mikulčice, Nitra or Pohansko, and a duchy in Pannonia at Mosapurc/Zaláar close to Lake Balaton. All these sites have yielded a rich archaeological heritage. Now a considerable number of samples have undergone genetic analysis in the context of the HistoGenes and the related FORMOR project. This and the following session in this strand present first results of this research in its archaeological and historical context. Who were the people leaving their marks in the centres of the new Slavic powers, what was their relationship to the Carolingian empire, and how did their communities cease?

327 - Genetic Histories in Times of Crisis, III: Communities in Late Avar Age and Carolingian Pannonia

Description
The former Roman province of Pannonia, and especially the region around Lake Balaton, had experienced a rather prosperous period under Avar rule, from c. 568 to 796. Unlike most neighbouring regions, the Avar-period population left extensive cemeteries with ample grave-goods. The Carolingian conquest in 795/96 precipitated a cultural transformation, and it took several decades until some political stability returned to the region with the Slavic dukes who had their residence at Zalávár, the Mosapurc of Carolingian texts. Who were the people who lived in the region at that time? What were their relations to earlier populations and to the Moravian centres? This session will present the latest evidence from genetics and archaeology, building on the work of Béla Miklós Szőke. The session will end with a response to the entire strand by Steffen Patzold.
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