Hello guest, if you read this it means you are not registered. Click here to register in a few simple steps, you will enjoy all features of our Forum.

Check for new replies
Scientists crack mystery of how MS gene spread
#1
Scientists crack mystery of how MS gene spread

10th January 2024, 11:09 EST

By Philippa Roxby
Health reporter


[Image: _132262717_illustration_3_creditsayostudio.jpg.webp]


Why are diseases more common in some parts of Europe than others, and why are northern Europeans taller than their southern counterparts?

An international team of scientists say they have unearthed the answer in the DNA of ancient teeth and bones.

The genes which protected our ancestors from animal diseases now raise the risk of multiple sclerosis (MS).

The researchers call their discovery "a quantum leap" in understanding the evolution of the disease.

And they say it could change opinions on what causes MS, and have an impact on the way it is treated.


Why look at MS?
There are about twice as many cases of multiple sclerosis per 100,000 people in north-western Europe, including the UK and Scandinavia, compared with southern Europe.

Researchers from the universities of Cambridge, Copenhagen and Oxford spent more than 10 years delving into archaeology to investigate why.
MS is a disease where the body's own immune cells attack the brain and spinal cord, leading to symptoms like muscle stiffness and problems walking and talking.

They discovered that genes which increase the risk of MS entered into north-western Europe about 5,000 years ago via a massive migration of cattle herders called Yamnaya.


For the rest, see:

https://www.bbc.com/news/health-67917294
Strider99, MacUalraig, rmstevens2 And 10 others like this post
Paper Trail: 42% English, 31.5% Scottish, 12.5% Irish, 6.25% German, 6.25% Sicilian & 1.5% French.
LDNA©: Britain & Ireland: 89.3% (51.5% English, 37.8% Scottish & Irish), N.W. Germanic: 7.8%, Europe South: 2.9% (Southern Italy & Sicily)
BigY 700: I1-Z141 >F2642 >Y3649 >Y7198 (c.365 AD) >Y168300 (c.410 AD) >A13248 (c.880 AD) >A13252 (c.1055 AD) >FT81015 (c.1285 AD) >A13243 (c.1620 AD) >FT80854 (c.1700 AD) >FT80630 (1893 AD).
Reply
#2
I have a sister-in-law who has MS.
Let us now praise famous men, and our fathers that begat us.

- Wisdom of Sirach 44:1
Reply
#3
(01-12-2024, 12:33 AM)rmstevens2 Wrote: I have a sister-in-law who has MS.

I’m really sorry to hear that!
rmstevens2 likes this post
Paper Trail: 42% English, 31.5% Scottish, 12.5% Irish, 6.25% German, 6.25% Sicilian & 1.5% French.
LDNA©: Britain & Ireland: 89.3% (51.5% English, 37.8% Scottish & Irish), N.W. Germanic: 7.8%, Europe South: 2.9% (Southern Italy & Sicily)
BigY 700: I1-Z141 >F2642 >Y3649 >Y7198 (c.365 AD) >Y168300 (c.410 AD) >A13248 (c.880 AD) >A13252 (c.1055 AD) >FT81015 (c.1285 AD) >A13243 (c.1620 AD) >FT80854 (c.1700 AD) >FT80630 (1893 AD).
Reply
#4
Another two sides of a coin: while a minority suffers for many with the right genotype and maybe lifestyle it is an advantage. The struggle of human evolution and life. Fascinating.
JMcB and rmstevens2 like this post
---
Main Projects
: Tyrol DNA, Alpine DNA, J2-M172, J2a-M67, J2a-PF5197, ISOGG Wiki, GenWiki;
Focus on Y-DNA: J2a-M67-L210, J2a-PF5197-PF5169, R1a-M17, R1b-U106-Z372
Reply
#5
An interesting finding indeed. A slight correction for the authors though is that this gene/mutation must have been present in the Corded Ware people as well given that the Steppe ancestors of NW Europeans are descended from Corded Ware directly not Yamnaya.
Rufus191, JMcB, rmstevens2 And 1 others like this post
Reply

Check for new replies

Forum Jump:


Users browsing this thread: 1 Guest(s)