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A genetic history of the Balkans from Roman frontier to Slavic migrations
(02-11-2024, 08:37 PM)ph2ter Wrote:
(02-11-2024, 04:21 PM)Riverman Wrote:
(02-11-2024, 04:08 PM)ambron Wrote: Regarding the West Slavic linguistic continuum between Poland and Slovenia, it is worth adding that Pannonian-Slavic was a West Slavic dialect. Today it remains as a Slavic substrate of the Hungarian language.

It seems pretty obvious that they were weakened by the Franks and Hungarians, when they cut them off. However, its sometimes being said that the Croats as an ally of the Franks came in rather from the North than the South too. Which makes me wonder about the Croat position. But like ph2ter pointed out recently, Croats are diverse among themselves. Yet I still wondered about their absence from these branches.

I am I2-A815 and this branch was prominent in Pohansko in 850. Today there are five Y-DNA tested Croats from this branch (1 from Split, 1 from Gorski Kotar, 1 from Karlovac, 1 from Varaždin, 1 is Vojvodina Croat).

I believe that such West Slavic branches were more frequent in Croatia before Turkish conquests. There is even one Slovak with Croatian origin that is also A815 and he came to Slovakia in times of Turkish conquest according to his family tradition. The part of Croatia which was under Turkish occupation experienced big population changes. The hinterland Vlachs became dominant and they were obviously in majority PH908.

I-A815 from Slovakia, he's surname was of lower nobility in Jezerski near Cazin.
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Do we have any information on the genetic structure of the Rit necropolis samples?
Y-DNA R-Z36 (A7967)                                                                          mtDNA U6A7A1
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One of the two E-V13 samples with Anatolian profiles in Viminacium are in the same (now quite rare) clade as one of the southeast Thracians from Kapitan Andreevo: E-BY5490 . They belong to parallel subclades which diverged from each other ca. 1500 BCE. 

Given the location of Kapitan Andreevo close to northwest Anatolia, it's quite likely that E-BY5490 from Viminacium is actually from the same region, perhaps a Bithynian Thracian.
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(02-12-2024, 01:57 PM)corrigendum Wrote: One of the two E-V13 samples with Anatolian profiles in Viminacium are in the same (now quite rare) clade as one of the southeast Thracians from Kapitan Andreevo: E-BY5490 . They belong to parallel subclades which diverged from each other ca. 1500 BCE. 

Given the location of Kapitan Andreevo close to northwest Anatolia, it's quite likely that E-BY5490 from Viminacium is actually from the same region, perhaps a Bithynian Thracian.

If they split 1.500 BC, that's before the major expansion events for E-V13 in the LBA-MIA and means very little in itself. But the combination of an West Asian shifted profile with the rarity makes a more South Eastern, so very South Eastern Thracian or even Anatolian Thracian, like you suggested, likely. Good catch.
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